BILL DWYRE

This boxer's back story is one for the books

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Now, the story really gets good.

He lives in a 9,654-square-foot house on Coast Line Drive in northwest Las Vegas. The address is strange for a city in a desert, until you realize the property is on a man-made lake with expensive boats docked out back.

Shumenov's house has a gym with equipment that took eight men to carry down the stairs — that was just one piece. There is a film room, an elevator, a huge garage with cabinets stuffed with almost every kind of boxing equipment that exists — gloves, headgear and the like.

There is also a 10-foot-by-10-foot refrigerator in the kitchen.

Shumenov starts his day at 5 a.m. by going to his hyperbaric chamber. That's in his house too. He does a full workout in his gym, then after lunch goes to another gym for running and swimming and still another for training and sparring.

He ends his day with two hours of Greco-Roman wrestling, before returning home around 8 and calling Chingas.

There's more.

His soul mate, who lives with him in the Las Vegas home, manages his affairs and his idiosyncrasies and is the vice president of his promotion company, KZ Events, is a young woman with curly blond hair named Cary Redlin, who weighs about as much as one of Shumenov's hand weights. She is from, of all places, North Dakota.

Redlin is a product of the nuns of the University of Mary in Bismarck, N.D. After graduation, she came to Las Vegas, much as Shumenov did. Because it was there. For a while, she worked in administration at McCarran International Airport.

A friend from North Dakota, working with Shumenov, saw that he was struggling to be both boxer and promoter and suggested he meet Redlin.

They went to lunch.

"I trusted her from that first day," he says.

He spoke no English. She spoke Fargo-ese. Somehow, it was a match made in heaven.

She is organized, tough and adept at handling the shady deal-making and shoddy bookkeeping common in the sport in which her man seeks to excel.

Together, this Kazakhstan-North Dakota team is poised to take on the boxing world, to be recognized. Are their chances good?

You betcha.

bill.dwyre@latimes.com

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