CHRIS DUFRESNE / ON COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Even Ohio State's Urban Meyer discovers the BCS just isn't fair

Buckeyes coach, for whom the Bowl Championship Series worked out well when he was at Florida, might see OSU locked out of the big game. Can next year's format remove crucial BCS flaws?

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Fans from Berkeley, Calif., to Key Biscayne, Fla., must have done a spontaneous spit take when Ohio State Coach Urban Meyer announced his frustration with the lame-duck Bowl Championship Series.

"I think it's a flawed system," Meyer said Monday.

Here's another bulletin: Bill Gates is rich.

Ohio State is 10-0 with three games left but is not likely to finish in the top two unless Alabama and/or Florida State lose. It would also help if Baylor lost.

The Buckeyes are currently third in the BCS standings, by a slim margin, with Baylor set to move to No. 3 if it wins Saturday at Oklahoma State.

Ohio State has won 22 straight games — it's just not fair!

The BCS worked out stupendously for Meyer at Florida when his Gators won national titles in 2006 and 2008 despite losing one game each of those seasons.

Remember Tim Tebow's "Never again" speech? That must be why Meyer also said of the BCS, "I think it was great for a while." The BCS worked so long as its decimal gods were on your side.

Meyer, in 2006, campaigned vociferously against Michigan's getting a rematch against Ohio State after the Wolverines lost a November heartbreaker in Columbus. "They had their shot," Meyer implored.

Florida outshouted Michigan for the second spot by a margin of .9445 to .9344. Florida then defeated Ohio State for the BCS title.

Only five years later, the same Southeastern Conference that employed Meyer insisted Alabama, despite not winning its own division, deserved a BCS rematch against Louisiana State.

The SEC rationale: That was then, this is now.

Alabama won the argument over Big 12 Conference champion Oklahoma State and whitewashed LSU for the championship.

System lobbying has been one of the many unintended and distasteful consequences of the BCS system.

In 2004, the great orator Mack Brown climbed on a box and insisted Texas belonged in the Rose Bowl instead of California, which had last appeared in 1959.

Cal Coach Jeff Tedford then refused to score a tack-on touchdown against Southern Mississippi just to impress the electorate. As a campaign tactic, it was like Michael Dukakis riding that tank back in 1988.

Brown swayed enough voters to get the Longhorns to Pasadena by the BCS margin of .8476 to .8347.

The Associated Press was so disgusted with the process it pulled out of the BCS formula, claiming it was journalistically unethical to be in a system it had been part of since 1998.

Lobbying supposedly will be not be tolerated next year when a selection committee makes the picks in a four-team playoff.

Pac-12 Conference Commissioner Larry Scott, speaking with reporters at the Washington-UCLA game at the Rose Bowl, said the selection panel was given specific marching orders.

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