JPMorgan board members targeted by shareholder advisers

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The family also holds a significant stake in defense contractor General Dynamics, where Crown is the lead independent director. He also was the chairman of Sara Lee Corp. when it split into two companies in 2012. Family members have investments in the Chicago Bulls, Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees.

What is less known is that the family also owns companies outright, including food processing equipment producer Provisur; trucking company Great Dane Trailers; the Aspen Skiing Co., which owns the Snowmass resort and The Little Nell hotel; and bus manufacturer Gillig LLC.

"He's never been CEO of a publicly traded company, but you don't have to be CEO," said Newton Minow, an attorney with Sidley Austin and a family friend. "What you have to have as a board member is judgment. That's the main thing. And he's got excellent judgment."

Pryce-Jones twisted that concept another way.

"We hear people say these board members bring perspective," he said. "Well, I can bring perspective. JPMorgan needs more than perspective. What they need is expertise."

Rivkin staying in Washington

Robert Rivkin, the former general counsel at both Aon and the CTA, has left his post as general counsel of the U.S. Department of Transportation and joined Delta Air Lines as senior vice president and deputy general counsel for regulatory and international affairs, based in Washington.

Rivkin's former boss, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, has announced he will step down from the Cabinet once a replacement is confirmed. Rivkin said he chose to stay in Washington afterward because his wife, Cindy Moelis, continues to run the White House Fellows program and his children are in high school in Washington and thriving.

Rivkin oversaw the popular "cash for clunkers" program early in President Barack Obama's first term. He said he was most proud of that effort; the administration's additional funding for infrastructure; and the consumer protections the department won for airline passengers.

"I realize that's slightly ironic considering where I am now," he said of becoming an airline executive.

He described Congress as "fully dysfunctional" and worried that it lacks the ability to compromise on both funding and a strategy for how to get the country's roads, ports and bridges "back in a state of repair."

"All you have to do is travel around the world, which I'm going to be doing a lot of, and see what other countries have done, from the train station in Berlin to the Asian airports" he said. "This notion that we have the best public infrastructure is 40 years out of date."

Melissa Harris can be reached at mmharris@tribune.com or 312-222-4582. Twitter @chiconfidential

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