Don't miss our chat with Dr. Danine Fruge of the Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa about shaping up after the holidays! Ask our experts how to achieve your fitness and diet resolutions. Dr. Fruge will address weight loss and lifestyle changes. Plus we'll have Dr. Susan Mitchell, nutrition expert and dietitian, as well as Pete McCall, an exercise physiologist from the American Council on Exercise, to answer your fitness and diet questions.

Can't make the chat? E-mail questions in advance to thanson@tribune.com

 Health Chat: Shaping up after the holidays(01/05/2011) 
12:09
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Welcome everyone and thank you for joining our chat about shaping up after the holidays
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:09 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:09
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Let's introduce our guests.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:09 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Family Circle calls Dr. Susan Mitchell their "go-to nutrition girl" who understands the belief that healthy food should taste good.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Thousands of listeners tune in to hear Dr. Mitchell's podcast on WDBO.com, her radio segments on Orlando's AM580 WDBO News-Talk radio and read her blog.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
She is also the author of 'I'd Kill for a Cookie: A Simple Six-Week Plan to Conquer Stress Eating'
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Dr. Danine Fruge, Associate Medical Director of the Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa, completed her residency in 2003 at the Florida Hospital in Orlando. She specializes in family and women’s health.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Like her colleagues at Pritikin, Dr. Fruge has been interviewed by national media as a leading expert on healthy living, nutrition and fitness.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Pritikin's residential program is 'based on daily exercise and natural, whole foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, seafood and limited lean meat. Since 1975, more than 100 studies in top medical journals have documented the Pritikin Program's success in helping the Center-s 90,000-plus guests achieve lifelong weight control.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
As an Exercise Physiologist with the American Council on Exercise (ACE), Pete McCall creates and delivers fitness education programs to uphold ACE???s mission of enriching quality of life through safe and effective exercise and physical activity.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
His area of expertise is in general strength and conditioning training, including sports-specific training, power training, core training, flexibility training, anaerobic energy system training, group exercise formats, personal training info, weight loss and muscular development.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:10
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Pete also assists USA Rugby with the High Performance Training program for members of the national team player pool.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:10 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:11
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Here's our first question:
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:11 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:11
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Welcome everyone and thank you for taking an interest in your health. As the Associate Medical Director of the Pritikin Longevity Center in Miami, FL, this is my passion and I am happy to be with you today. For your best health, it is important to speak to your doctor personally regarding your specific health concerns. This web chat is an general educational service and is not a substitute for specific medical advice from your doctor.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:11 Dr Danine Fruge
12:11
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
I know Pritikin has helped lots of people, like Michael Moore, lose weight. In addition to following the Pritkin diet, what lifestyle changes do you suggest?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:11 Leigh
12:12
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Consistency in making little changes which add up day by day.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:12 Dr Danine Fruge
12:12
Pete McCall: 
Thanks for the introduction, it's a pleasure to be here to help answer questions and address concerns.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:12 Pete McCall
12:13
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Such as sticking with an exercise program - daily is best. Variety is important.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:13 Dr Danine Fruge
12:13
Pete McCall: 
Large-scale lifestyle changes don't happen right away, the important thing is to try to do a little more at a time
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:13 Pete McCall
12:14
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
I'm glad to be here as well. Happy new year all! I agree with Dr. Fruge. Lifestyle changes...small simple ones over time...are the smart way to make lasting change.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:14 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:14
Pete McCall: 
Research indicates that adding more activity in throughout the day: such as walking up stairs, parking far away from the store, doing physical chores can help expend an additional 300calories/day
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:14 Pete McCall
12:15
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
I get up from my desk several times a day and go down the hall and walk the stairs once or twice...just to move from the sedentary computer position.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:15 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:15
Pete McCall: 
From an exercise perspective, simply try to find opportunities to walk or do small physical-based chairs and build from there.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:15 Pete McCall
12:15
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
In the New Year, it's easy to start out strong, then when the exercise routine gets dull, start slacking off. What do you suggest for making it more fun?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:15 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:16
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Variety...engage in activities that are fun for you. Join in with friends as well for support. When it's fun, it's not like work.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:16 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:17
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Even isometrics at your desk or in your office. Simple stretching, and casual activity that doesn't require a large time commitment or lots of exercise gear can really start to add up.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:17 Dr Danine Fruge
12:17
Pete McCall: 
Find activities that can be done with friends.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:17 Pete McCall
12:18
Pete McCall: 
The big trend right now is in small-group training which involves one trainer working with 3-5 people; it's a great way to have instructed exercise programs AND a social outlet with friends
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:18 Pete McCall
12:18
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Most people tell me that time is the biggest issue. They're time crunched and can't work in exercise. There are numerous videos now for 10-minute workouts when your day is totally jammed.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:18 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:19
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Denise has a question about diet and exercise ...
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:19 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:19
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Use music, an exercise buddy (even your favorite dog), Xbox or Wii activity games. These can be fun and interesting ways to burn calories and get exercise without "feeling" like you're exercising. At Pritikin, I had one grandmother burn over 800 calories per hour playing a dance game online with her granddaughter, which led to a 30-pound weight loss.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:19 Dr Danine Fruge
12:19
[Comment From Denise Denise : ] 
I lose weight very fast if I diet and exercise, which I did at the beginning of 2010. But I have gained the 40 lbs back again. I feel like I am yoyo dieting. I want to lose the weight and keep it off but how do I do that?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:19 Denise
12:20
Pete McCall: 
Working with a trainer, whether one-on-one or in a small group, will provide challenging and fun exercise programs. If the trainer doesn't make it fun and instead is promoting exercises which hurt then switch trainers.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:20 Pete McCall
12:20
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Hi Denise, be sure and address the emotional aspects of weight loss. Many times eating is all about stress and emotions. Do you notice that you eat when you're mad or sad?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:20 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:21
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Don't use a diet. At Pritkin, we teach focusing on healthy food choices everyday and activity everyday. Try not to miss two days in a row. Then, you will not ever yo-yo and your weight loss will be maintained.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:21 Dr Danine Fruge
12:21
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
For me its more a mental battle. I eat for pleasure rather than survival. For instance, I will eat and eat and eat even though I am full. I just want the constant gratification and pleasure of it. How do you suggest overcoming this?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:21 Chelsey
12:22
Pete McCall: 
To the comment about yo-yo dieting: Think about a comprehensive, long-term nutritional plan as opposed to a "diet." A "diet" indicates short-term while making small changes to your overall nutritional intake can provide dramatic results BUT it takes a while and commitment to make the small, incremental changes
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:22 Pete McCall
12:22
[Comment From Denise Denise : ] 
Yes, I feel I eat more when I am under a lot of stress.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:22 Denise
12:23
Pete McCall: 
Planning for the week is an important component for maintaining a healthy diet. Taking the time to prepare healthy meals and snacks during the weekend will provide you with plenty of healthy options during the week when you might not have the time to prepare healthy meals
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:23 Pete McCall
12:23
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Chelsey, find pleasure in something other than food. Think about other activities that bring you joy and substitute them when you begin to eat and eat. This goes for Denise too. Many women will say that they reach for food as an outlet to all of their stress.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:23 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:23
Pete McCall: 
Shouldn't have used diet; should have said nutrition plan.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:23 Pete McCall
12:24
Dr Danine Fruge: 
If you find yourself eating when you're not hungry, it is definitely worth your while to find out why. Then, you can substitute healthy stress-coping skills, freindship, other activities instead of eating when you're bored, lonely, stressed, etc.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:24 Dr Danine Fruge
12:24
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
So, get to the bottom of the stress. See what can be done to deal with it in ways other than food. Food calls your name, it's everywhere and easy to turn to but it needs a better substitute.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:24 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:24
[Comment From betty betty : ] 
Any hints for sticking to a healthy food plan?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:24 betty
12:24
Pete McCall: 
Stress is influenced by hormones; exercise helps to regulate hormones related to stress
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:24 Pete McCall
12:25
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Betty, when I see the word "sticking," I think of a 'diet'. Your healthy foods should be delicious and enjoyable. Healthy food does not mean tasteless cardboard : )
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:25 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:25
Pete McCall: 
Eating can produce feel good hormones, so can exercise. Learning how to do a little exercise (like getting outside for a walk) when stressed can help deal with the hormones produced by a stressful situation
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:25 Pete McCall
12:26
[Comment From Kaley Kaley : ] 
Is it true that your body goes into "starvation mode" under 1200 calories a day? I am on a medication that makes me choke down food. I am 5'2" and weigh 106 lbs. Not even sure how many calories I SHOULD eat, but usually I eat about 800.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:26 Kaley
12:26
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
I agree completely with Pete. Exercise is such a great stress-buster...getting out and clearing your mind...producing endorphins and then food doesn't look so good.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:26 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:27
Pete McCall: 
The suggestion to prepare meals is a good one. For example on Sundays my wife and I will grill meat, steam and saute vegetables and cut up fruit/carrots for snacks and have them pre-packaged for the week. This ensures that we have plenty of healthy options that we can "grab and go" when necessary.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:27 Pete McCall
12:27
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
Yes you are all right. It is when I am stressed or feel like I have nothing to look forward to when I binge. The problem is, when I start a new healthy lifestyle I feel so bound my walls. Life consists of work, exercising, eating healthy foods and not the really tasty ones and no drinking, I then begin to feel like I have nothing to look forward to. Then I binge. It's the feeling of not having freedom or anything to look forward to.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:27 Chelsey
12:28
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Fruits, vegetables, snacks which are nutritious, tasty and filling. Aim for eating about 5 times a day (watch portion size). Never skip meals, it is especially important to get the majority of your calories in before evening.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:28 Dr Danine Fruge
12:28
Pete McCall: 
The weeks that we don't have the time (or make the time) for our 'food prep' sessions are weeks where I notice my food choices are not that good and my energy levels go down as a result -- that really helps us to stay focused and make that time on the weekend. It's a good, productive activity that we do together, which makes it more fun.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:28 Pete McCall
12:30
Dr Danine Fruge: 
I agree with Pete. At Pritkin we focus a lot on preparing healthy meals and snacks that actually do taste good ahead of time. You can look forward to eating good and feeling good even on your busiest days.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:30 Dr Danine Fruge
12:30
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Chelsey, plan events to look forward to. They don't need to be big or expensive. My girlfriend calls them lily pads...she jumps from pad to pad...just an example she uses that it's fun to plan ahead so you do have things to look forward to and don't turn to food.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:30 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:30
Pete McCall: 
Chelsey: my suggestion would be to try small changes as opposed to making too many changes at once. if you try to do too much and find that you can't stick with it, then it's easy to beat yourself up and think "why bother?" but if you focus on one small change at a time then over the course of the long run you will make dramatic lifestyle changes
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:30 Pete McCall
12:31
Pete McCall: 
Too bad we can't edit life into an easy 44-min, one-time-a-week TV show; but making changes is a difficult process that takes months as opposed to hours or days.

Start small with trying to make 30 min for exercise (walking is very effective) 3 times a week (2 times during the week and once on the weekend) and go from there.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:31 Pete McCall
12:31
[Comment From Vikki Vikki : ] 
I always get an energy drop about 3-4 PM and end up slurping down a high-calorie coffee beverage, any ideas for low cal, healthy alternatives for pep?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:31 Vikki
12:32
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Back to Kaley, unless you are under a doctor's supervision, 800 calories per day is quite low.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:32 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:32
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Also a great point by Susan. Don't think of healthy eating as deprivation but as your choice to have the health you deserve. If you want to splurge periodically, that is much better than never trying at all or being too strict and giving up.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:32 Dr Danine Fruge
12:33
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Vikki, try a lean protein, high-fiber snack such as low fat-cheese and whole grain crackers or fresh fruit or a small handful of nuts with fruit...the hype of the caffeine is temporary and it does work but you typically feel worse later, correct?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:33 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:34
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
That is a good point! I will try and make little things to look forward to. Thank you!
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:34 Chelsey
12:34
Pete McCall: 
Once you've hit the goal of 3 times/week and stick with it, then you'll notice that you will be able to make other small goals: like eating more fruits or cutting out sodas and be able to stay with them.

When I was a full-time personal trainer I taught my clients two key principles:
1. Kaizen - the Japanese philosophy of change or improvement 1% at a time; change a little each day and over the course of 100 days you can change your life.

2. "Be not afraid of going slowly, be afraid of standing still" - an ancient Chinese proverb.

It used to annoy my clients, but the messages are critical for long-term adherence
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:34 Pete McCall
12:35
Dr Danine Fruge: 
To avoid afternoon lows, eat more in am, say 10 am snack, satisfying lunch and avoid processed corn syrup snacks which drain your energy and concentration by afternoon, also activity liking walking, fresh air, yoga etc can help add afternoon energy.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:35 Dr Danine Fruge
12:35
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
Good advice Susan! Fruit is filling and the sugar gives you the energy and satisfaction you need!
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:35 Chelsey
12:35
[Comment From Vikki Vikki : ] 
i do feel worse later and have also heard negative things about diet soda, which I'm trying to remove from my diet.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:35 Vikki
12:35
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
I love #2 and think how still we have all become...so easy to let everything do all the work for us...movement is key.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:35 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:36
Pete McCall: 
To support what the Dr's have said: When it comes to nutrition, shoot to be a high-B student. Don't worry about eating right 100% of the time -- that is extremely difficult to do; instead shoot for 85-90% of the time; give yourself one cheat meal (within reason) a week AND have a plan for exercising that day or the next day so you can expend the energy (calories) consumed during that meal
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:36 Pete McCall
12:36
[Comment From Anna Anna : ] 
Say you want to lose 30 pounds by Memorial Day. The first 15 are always fairly easy. Then you hit the dreaded plateau. What is the best way to kick your metabolism back into gear when this happens?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:36 Anna
12:37
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Good for you Vikki. Even if you have caffeine on occasion, don't forego the healthy snack....just remember it's a snack, not a meal : )
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:37 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:37
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Great points. Never despise the day of small beginnings. Never give up.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:37 Dr Danine Fruge
12:37
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
Pete, the problem is, when you don't really have weight to lose, there's not much room for error. So small changes don't seem to make a big difference in the last 10 pounds. For instance. I am 5'5" and 129. My goal is to get to 118. I have a smaller frame so I feel this is attainable. However, if I am not mostly on plan most of the time, it would be near impossible to get where I want; no?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:37 Chelsey
12:38
Pete McCall: 
Ahhh, the bathing suit body my Memorial Day...it was a staple of my business. It is approx 20 weeks until Memorial Day, which means you should change your exercise routine 2-3 times during that time period.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:38 Pete McCall
12:39
Dr Danine Fruge: 
When you hit a plateau, you have two powerful allies to bust through, change your workout and cut 20% from your serving size without being hungry. Think of it as spring training for sports, this extra push is shorterm effort for longterm benefit.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:39 Dr Danine Fruge
12:39
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
For Memorial Day, you're talking a loss of 6 pounds per month or a little over one pound per week, which is about all of a loss that is really going to stay off. So a steady commitment to eating and exercise is needed.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:39 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:39
Pete McCall: 
Periodization is the concept of changing exercise frequency, intensity and volume on a regular basis; this helps overcome plateaus and continues to challenge the body to work differently. "Muscle confusion" (term used by a popular infomercial) is actually the science of "undulating" or "non-linear" periodization which was developed by Soviet (and eastern block) sport scientists years ago
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:39 Pete McCall
12:40
[Comment From Peter Peter : ] 
I realized recently that even though I get 8 hours of sleep a night, I still seem to need a nap at 2 pm. Is that healthy? Is there some way I can nix out that lag and make 2011 more active?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:40 Peter
12:40
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
I think periodization also helps prevent boredom.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:40 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:41
Pete McCall: 
For a 20-week program, I'd change it up about every 6-7 weeks; and keep in mind that the only way to develop muscular definition is with heavier weights and higher intensity movements like jumps and explosive lifts. The belief of "light weights w/hi reps" does NOT promote muscle tone, only muscular endurance
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:41 Pete McCall
12:42
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Remember weight loss is not the focus. We teach at Pritikin to focus on life long habit changes that change your body and improve your life. As you build muscle and lose fat you will love your shape and not care how much you weigh. Then you will never have to worry about getting ready for bathing suit season again.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:42 Dr Danine Fruge
12:43
Pete McCall: 
Chelsey: There are a lot of variables in your answer; but you can still find some small changes like increasing the intensity of an exercise program (to add more resistance or more explosive movements), which will stimulate new muscle fibers (type II) which can help improve metabolism
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:43 Pete McCall
12:44
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
For someone near 50 who does some bike riding and walking regularly, what should they do to start lifting weights?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:44 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:44
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Thank you Dr. Fruge for bringing up body acceptance and self-love. We as women tend to beat ourselves up over everything about how we look. Our own worse critics. When you like yourself, no matter your weight, life looks different.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:44 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:44
Pete McCall: 
I'm promoting high-intensity training which produces results; however keep in mind that a high intensity program is NOT the starting point. Start slowly, work on improving muscular strength and endurance, then over the course of time start increasing the intensity by adding more weights OR explosive movements in order to stimulate the desired changes
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:44 Pete McCall
12:45
Pete McCall: 
http://www.acefitness.org/article/3159/?utm_source=Health+eTips+Quick+Start+Guide&utm_medium=email&utm_term=December+29+2010&utm_campaign=Consumer+Outreach&CMP=EMC-HET_1210QuickStartGuide">

This is a link to our 12-week program (developed by yours truly), which provides a proper progression to higher intensity exercises.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:45 Pete McCall
12:46
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
Pete: What do you mean by "explosive movements?"
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:46 Leigh
12:46
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Sleep is very important for health, weight loss, memory, energy and disease prevention. 7-8 hrs is avg for most, some need more. Ask yourself if you feel rested when you wakeup in AM? if not, you should talk to your MD as you may have a correctable sleep issue. naps are fine as long as you have time to exercise and keep your life going.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:46 Dr Danine Fruge
12:46
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
I agree with start slowly as any injury can take longer to heal as you near fifty.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:46 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:46
Pete McCall: 
Dr. Mitchell: Please keep in mind that many men also deal with body image issues. "The Adonis Complex" documented body image issues in men.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:46 Pete McCall
12:47
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Very true. I think our society puts too much focus on looks versus health for both men and women.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:47 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:48
Pete McCall: 
Leigh: Explosive movements include jumps, medicine ball throws (talk about a good stress reliever), boxing/kickboxing movements, kettlebells swings, sandbag throws...etc. The important this is to work on stability, mobility and strength first before progressing to challenging, explosive movements.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:48 Pete McCall
12:48
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Is it normal for runners or walkers to have their hands sometimes swell after an hour or so?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:48 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:49
Dr Danine Fruge: 
As we age we lose bone and muscle that we can make up for with resistance training, this is very important to avoid fractures, injury and imbalance that many people experience.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:49 Dr Danine Fruge
12:49
Pete McCall: 
The definition of fitness that I use is to have the strength and ability to do what you want WHEN you want to do it; NOT trying to achieve a certain "look" or aesthetic appearance. the bottom line is that your muscle does not know how it looks, only that it can produce (or reduce) force.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:49 Pete McCall
12:51
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Most men do not face this issue, but for the ladies, make sure to have enough protein in your diet. As women age, they tend to eat less protein.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:51 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:51
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Any suggestions for women who have reached menopause? Some women have said they seem to be gaining weight, though they're not eating or exercising differently.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:51 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:51
Dr Danine Fruge: 
At Pritikin since 1958 we have been recommending to limit your sodium intake to less than 1500 mg per day even for people who do not have high-blood pressure, even young active people can retain water, swell and bloat. So we see much less of this as people change their salt intake at pritikin even over 1 weeks time.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:51 Dr Danine Fruge
12:52
Pete McCall: 
The hands swelling issue would probably deals with the circulatory system; it would be worth your time to ask your doctor about that to make sure there is not an underlying health issue
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:52 Pete McCall
12:53
Dr Danine Fruge: 
agree with pete, swelling can mean an underlying medical issue and should be monitored with your MD
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:53 Dr Danine Fruge
12:53
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
With menopause and the declining estrogen level, weight goes thru a redistribution and begins to accumulate at the belly instead of the thighs and hips.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:53 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:54
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Women refer to it as a menopot. With a loss of lean muscle in many cases, the daily caloric needs are often less.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:54 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:54
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
If a doctor advises a patient to cut back on sodium, what is the best way to do this?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:54 Orlando Sentinel Health
12:56
Dr Danine Fruge: 
in menopause women need to pay attention to avoiding hidden calories and missing workouts, even if you don't feel your best. As susan said, the weight goes to your belly before your hips which can lead to diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, etc.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:56 Dr Danine Fruge
12:56
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Processed foods of all types ... typically loaded with sodium. Become a label sleuth and check the Nutrition Facts label for the amount of sodium per serving. Reach for fresh, whole foods instead whenever possible.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:56 Dr. Susan Mitchell
12:58
Pete McCall: 
During menopause the body's endocrine system (which produces the chemical or hormones that regulate bodily functions) is undergoing dramatic change; maintaining a regular exercise program can help to regulate endocrine function. Pay attention to energy levels, if feeling low-energy then lower the exercise intensity for the day (going for a walk as opposed to a run) or take the day off (if maintaining a consistent exercise program).
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:58 Pete McCall
12:59
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
Pete, I really want to get into strength training but I have so many reservations. I already have a good amount of muscle from playing sports for 7 years. I just developed fat over it. I don't want big muscles at all. Second, I notice almost every strength training exercise I do, my joints hurt! I am only 23! Do you know what I could do to help this? ALSO, could running 2.5 miles 5-6 days a week tone?!
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:59 Chelsey
12:59
Dr Danine Fruge: 
To easily reduce sodium, read labels. Pick foods that have lower salt, a 1:1 ratio calories to sodium. If 300 kcal than look for 300 mg sodium, if 300 kcal and 900 mg sodium, way too much at 1:1 ratio. Focus on foods that are not in a package or box and you'll get less sodium.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:59 Dr Danine Fruge
12:59
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
I really am curious as to whether or not running tones you. Or do I need to stick with lunges and squats for my legs and butt?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 12:59 Chelsey
1:01
Pete McCall: 
Chelsey: Doing lower reps (4-6) with heavier loads (fatiguing by the 6th repetition) will not increase muscle fiber size, it will increase muscle fiber density and will improve the neuromuscular function of the muscle by activating more motor units. Definition comes from a state of semi-contraction of the muscle which is only achieved by using the muscle. Running is an effective way to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and manage weight (through energy expenditure) but it would not be my recommendation for developing muscle definition.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:01 Pete McCall
1:01
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Why do some people sweat so much while working out or have their face turn red when running?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:01 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:03
Dr Danine Fruge: 
It is amazing that there is often more salt in cereal or bread than in a pretzel or chip because its baked in you don't taste it when its on the surface it can taste saltier but actually contain less. Check out www.pritikin.com for great tips.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:03 Dr Danine Fruge
1:04
Pete McCall: 
What exercises are you doing? And what do you mean by "joints hurt?" Which ones, how painful? It might be worth your time to work with a trainer for a few sessions who can do a movement screen with you to identify which joints might not be working properly and then addressing that through an exercise program. If you ask a trainer about movement screens and they're not familiar with the term -- DO NOT USE that trainer

Lunges, squats, step-ups, hip hinges, all are good exercises for the glutes. Check out www.acefitness.org/exerciselibrary (FREE) for a number of exercises (and pre-programmed exercise routines)
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:04 Pete McCall
1:04
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Many people believe their salt comes from the shaker but actually it's more thru the food and the addition of salt during cooking and/or processing
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:04 Dr. Susan Mitchell
1:04
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
Thanks Pete! So the key is to lift 'til you can't anymore!
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:04 Chelsey
1:05
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Are there benefits to sea salt?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:05 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:05
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Sometimes the size of the sea salt crystal is larger so the amount of sodium intake is less but no real nutritional benefit.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:05 Dr. Susan Mitchell
1:06
Pete McCall: 
There is a difference between failure and fatigue; the idea with weight training is to fatigue by the last rep (meaning not able to do any more than 6) and not to induce muscle failure (meaning the muscle will not perform another repetition)
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:06 Pete McCall
1:06
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Face turning red can simply mean fairer skin and more surface blood vessels are showing; sweating is complex but watch your fluid levels, how much you sweat is not always an indicator of how hard you work. Any concerns please discuss with your MD.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:06 Dr Danine Fruge
1:07
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Is it true that the best "recovery" drink is chocolate milk? If so, why? And does the average person need a recovery drink?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:07 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:08
Pete McCall: 
the face turning red could mean the exercise intensity is too high and the body can't deliver the oxygen and nutrients necessary to perform the physical work; it might be a good idea to scale back on intensity to see how that works and check with your doctor about possible issues which Dr. Fruge mentions
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:08 Pete McCall
1:08
[Comment From Chelsey Chelsey : ] 
Pete, my joints crack constantly and the pain isn't bad but it's annoying! Sometimes I feel more workout on my joints than the muscle!
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:08 Chelsey
1:09
[Comment From Betty-lou Betty-lou : ] 
How you feel about the Atkins diet?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:09 Betty-lou
1:09
Dr. Susan Mitchell: 
Lowfat chocolate milk provides not only carbohydrates but protein which is also important in the recovery process so milk is a nice package. The average person doesn't necessarily need a recovery drink...typically someone working out an hour or longer. What do you think Pete?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:09 Dr. Susan Mitchell
1:09
Pete McCall: 
Chocolate milk isn't the BEST recovery drink, but an effective one b/c it has a good ratio of Protein:carbohydrates:fats; the issue is the high amount of calories. It is critical to have the proper nutrition within the first 30-45 min of finishing an exercise session, especially one that focuses on higher intensity exercises like weight training and sprinting
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:09 Pete McCall
1:10
Pete McCall: 
if you don't have time for a meal or don't want to spend the money on expensive supplements (eas myoplex deluxe is my fave for post-training recovery) then choc milk is a good alternative (that I used when in Vegas last week)
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:10 Pete McCall
1:11
Pete McCall: 
For info on what/when to eat regarding exercise and training do an internet search for "nutrient timing" this area has expanded significantly in recent years and researchers are realizing that the timing of nutrition intake is critical for to help recover from a training session and prepare the body for the next one
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:11 Pete McCall
1:11
Dr Danine Fruge: 
AGREE with Pete and Susan. People need to stay well hydrated and well fed which means drinking and eating healthy prior to workouts and not skipping meals; watch out for excess alcohol and caffeine which are dehydrating. Focus on good nutrition and avoid depleting yourself and you don't necessarily need a special recovery drink.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:11 Dr Danine Fruge
1:13
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Nutrient timing: http://www.google.com/search?q=nutrient+timing
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:13 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:13
Pete McCall: 
Even if your goal is weight loss, it is critical to have a meal after a training session (not a scone or muffin with a coffee drink) that has pro, carbs AND fats (poly and mono unsaturated). When we do multi-game rugby tourneys I have the players use PB and J on whole wheat, bananas and oranges as the immediate post-match recovery snack and it helps maintain energy throughout a tourney
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:13 Pete McCall
1:14
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
For someone who has been diagnosed as pre-diabetic and wants to take control of the situation, in addition to diet, what exercises would you suggest?
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:14 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:15
Pete McCall: 
Start with walking; it's extremely effective at promoting health and managing weight. Start with 20-30 min at a time, 2-3 times/week and progress from there. Using our library to find bodyweight exercises will give you options for exercises that you can do from home with little-to-no equipment once you establish a fitness base with a walking program
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:15 Pete McCall
1:15
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Find out more on the American Council on Exercise website
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:15 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:16
Pete McCall: 
One issue that many people have this time of year is trying to do too much at once; be realistic with your time available for exercise, start with small goals (3x/week instead of everyday) and progress from there.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:16 Pete McCall
1:16
Dr Danine Fruge: 
Almost every week at Pritikin I have the pleasure of seeing people with diabetes and prediabetes improve by just starting to workout.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:16 Dr Danine Fruge
1:16
Pete McCall: 
Thanks for the opportunity to be a part of this chat
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:16 Pete McCall
1:16
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Find out more at Pritikin Longetivity Center & Spa website
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:16 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:16
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
If you missed any part of this event, a transcript will be available later today.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:16 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:16
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Thank you for joining our chat and thank you to our guests for sharing their expertise.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:16 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:17
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Keep up with the latest on Dr. Susan Mitchell's blog
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:17 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:17
Orlando Sentinel Health: 
Listen to Dr. Mitchell's weekly podcast, Straight Talk About Eating Smart.
Wednesday January 5, 2011 1:17 Orlando Sentinel Health
1:17