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Live Health Chat

Got Acne? Other skin problems? Read the live web chat transcript

By Prue Salasky

Ask the Experts about skin problems

12:00 PM EST, January 19, 2011

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Read the transcript of our live Web chat on Acne and other skin problems from noon EST (11 a.m. CST, 9 a.m. PST) on Wednesday, Jan. 19. Experts including a dermatologist, a nurse specializing in adolescent medicine and the director of a skin disorders institute can answer all your questions regarding healthy skin.

Transcripts of previous chats are available at www.dailypress.com/health at Archived Live Web Chats.


 Got Acne? other skin problems? Ask the Experts(01/19/2011) 
11:22
Don Mann, Producer: 
Welcome! The chat will begin at noon. Feel free to submit your questions now, and we will address them when the chat starts.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 11:22 Don Mann, Producer
12:00
Prue: 
Readers: We're LIVE. Welcome to our weekly Wednesday Web chat. Today's topic is Acne and other skin disorders. You can ask our experts all your questions about healthy skin and how to overcome the cold weather and its effects too.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:00 Prue
12:01
reginald henry: 
Hello, I am Dr. Reginald Henry ( I go by the nickname Buck). I finished college at Duke University, and went to Med School and did my Dermatology training at University of Virginia.
I have been in Dermatology practice here with the Sentara Medical system since 1986.
Please forgive me, I am a very slow hunt and peck typer so you will have to bare with my slowness. I will also make lots of typing errors but will probably not go back and correct them as the point of this is not to correct typing errors, but to be informative in a short period of time. This whole introduction has been pre typed.
I would be happy to try to answer ANY SKIN questions for you. Specific or not.
Before we start, I need to say that there are some questions that I will not be able to answer - rashes are very visual and I more often than not I may not be able to identify a rash only from a description over the internet. Rashes often need to be seen in person, and sometimes even then we have a tough time making a specific diagnosis without a biopsy . There are literally thousands of rashes. So if today a person describes "an itchy rash that consists of bumps and blisters on their legs only in the summer and sort of gets better with a prescription cream", I will say this could be from hundreds of causes and the rash needs to be seen in person by a DERMATOLOGIST, who knows about those hundreds of rashes.
That being said, I'd be glad to TRY to answer any skin questions that anyone has.
Obviously the internet is loaded with medical information begging to be read. Be sure the source is reputable - careful of websites trying to sell you something. The American Academy of Dermatology (aad.org) is a great starting place for dermatological information.

Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:01 reginald henry
12:01
reginald henry: 
Any specific questions?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:01 reginald henry
12:01
[Comment From DMDM: ] 
Our 5-month-old grandson has been diagnosed with eczema. What can we do to treat this condition
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:01 DM
12:02
reginald henry: 
Eczema, or atopic dermatitis (AD), is an extremely complicated problem. Basically patients with AD have very sensitive skin that breaks out with th e most minor insult.
A great resourse is EASE (Eczema Association for Science and education)
....
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:02 reginald henry
12:02
Prue: 
Our experts today are Dr. Reginald B. Henry with Sentara Dermatology and LaDonna Finch, executive director of the Skin Disorders Institute.
Welcome Dr. Henry and thanks for the great introduction.
I have several questions that readers have e-mailed in advance.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:02 Prue
12:03
Prue: 
Are there creams/ointments that you shouldn't use for a child's eczema that you might use for an adult?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:03 Prue
12:03
reginald henry: 
regarding AD, moisturizers and topical cortisones are the mainstay of therapy. you need to control the itch because infection can develop in the broken skin.
......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:03 reginald henry
12:04
reginald henry: 
steroid creams that are givento you by an md should be low potency. otc moisturizers are ok for adults and kids
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:04 reginald henry
12:05
reginald henry: 
the key to moisturizers is to use them right after bathing when the skin is wet
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:05 reginald henry
12:05
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
I am LaDonna Finch, director of the Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute (ISDI) located in Newport News, Va. we do not prescribe or diagnose, however we do supply information. Eczema im infants is fairly common, dry, red itchy skin is classic, it is important to keep the skin moisturized.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:05 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:06
reginald henry: 
I woul ddefinitely suggest getting your grandchild to a dermatologist to get on a specific regimine. very complicated disease, hard to treat over the internet -lots to learn!!!!
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:06 reginald henry
12:06
Prue: 
Hi LaDonna - Welcome. How would you recommend keeping skin moisturized when it's sensitive.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:06 Prue
12:07
[Comment From SMSM: ] 
I have Vitiligo on my hands an dother places on my body. It is appearing on my face. What remedies are tehre.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:07 SM
12:07
reginald henry: 
Regarding AD, usually cream based (rather than alcohol based LOTIONS) are pretty well tolerated - bath oils are also soothing
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:07 reginald henry
12:08
reginald henry: 
People with vitiligo get white spots on their skin. Basically the skin DEPIGMENTS, and all color is lost. Leaving white spots. It is thought to be autoimmune ┐┐┐ the immune system attacks the pigment, causing the problem.
There is no great treatment for vitiligo. Rub on cortisone creams sometimes help, but need to be used for 2-3 years. Light therapy, another immune modulating treatment, also sometimes helps a bit, but again must be done for years and is not all that effective.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:08 reginald henry
12:08
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Like mentioned earlier apply lotion or cream to moist skin...with in 3 mins. after bathing,
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:08 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:08
Prue: 
Are there some creams that are better for sensitive skin than others?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:08 Prue
12:09
[Comment From SamSam: ] 
I have a history of skin cancer in my family, but don't have any problems I know about right now. At age 45, should I go to a dermatologist, or just have my GP check me out?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:09 Sam
12:09
reginald henry: 
Regarding moisturizers, there are lots of brands out htere, CETAPHIL CREAM, CERAVE CREAM are relativel inexpensive and of good quality.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:09 reginald henry
12:10
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Thew ISDI is a member of the Coalition of Skin Disease-(CSD) they also have a Vitiligo support group that may be helpful. For more infgo you can contact our office at 757-223-0795
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:10 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:10
reginald henry: 
Regarding skin cancers, I think as long as you don't notice any new spots, its perfectly fine to have your GP watch you..........
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:10 reginald henry
12:11
Prue: 
Readers: We are talking to a dermatologist and the director of a skin disorders institute. They can answer your questions about skin care.

What is VItiligo?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:11 Prue
12:11
reginald henry: 
regarding cancers, a dermatologist could tell you more specifically with pix what to be on the lookout for.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:11 reginald henry
12:12
[Comment From MikeMike: ] 
A couple of questions:
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:12 Mike
12:12
[Comment From MikeMike: ] 
Why does acne appear only on the face, and not other body parts? AND, assuming that acne arises from glands, why have these glands evolved in such a way as to be distributed only in the face? What evolutionary advantage is there to having these glands on the face and nowhere else?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:12 Mike
12:12
reginald henry: 
people can get acne on the face, ALSO the back, chest , less commonly arms and legs........
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:12 reginald henry
12:13
Prue: 
I see you answered the Vitiligo question earlier... sorry.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:13 Prue
12:13
[Comment From LisaLisa: ] 
My 16-year-old daughter has an acne problem. It is on the edges of her face; she washes her face every night and removes all makeup. We have tried Proactiv and gone to doctor for a wash. But she broke out more. What do you recommend.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:13 Lisa
12:13
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
In regard to creams and lotions there are many over the counter products, what works for some may not work for others. People with dry skin often prefer creams over lotions. The ISDI offers a TRY before you BUY program to sample several types of products,
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:13 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:13
Prue: 
OK - we have lots of questions about Acne. What is it? And what's the best treatment? Do you have any opinion on Proactiv which is marketed so aggressively?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:13 Prue
12:14
reginald henry: 
hormones affect oil gland activity, there are more oil glands on the face and back and chest than elsewhere. why evolutionarily????? you got me.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:14 reginald henry
12:14
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
First of all it is important to follow up with your doctor if the acne broke out more.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:14 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:15
reginald henry: 
Acne is caused by oil accumulating underneath the skin, stuck behind a plugged up oil gland. It is hormone related (most often seen in teenagers with oily skin whose hormones are rapidly elevating). It often runs in the family. It can be worsened by stress.
Acne cannot be washed off with soap and water, and generally is not felt to be food related. That is not to say that teenagers should not wash their faces or should not eat right, but the cure for acne isn't simple. Most everyone gets some acne, and most everyone outgrows it by the mid 20's.
Till acne is outgrown, otc medicated soaps with benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid can be used as a start. Another over the counter popular medication (with lots of advertising behind it!) is ProActiv. It also contains benzoyl peroxide as the active ingredient ┐┐┐ similar to old fashioned Clearasil. Further than that, there are prescription meds such as RETIN A which are good pore unpluggers. For the deep infected lesions, antibiotics can be used. None of these are 100% effective in getting rid of all acne, but in correct combinations do a good job with keeping it down.
If you can’t get rid of your acne on your own, see a dermatologist who would know the best thing for YOUR SPECIFIC kind of acne.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:15 reginald henry
12:16
Prue: 
What do you recommend for face care? How often should you wash? with what?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:16 Prue
12:16
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
I have really oily skin. Is there a moisturizer you recommend that won't make it worse?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:16 Guest
12:16
reginald henry: 
re acne: you mentioned using a wash - i don't think washes work well as you put them on and then wash them off - they don't have time to do anything
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:16 reginald henry
12:17
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Just like other disease treatment everyone does not react the same. There have been many success stories on ProActive. I would suggest once you find what works for you to be compliant and use as directed as often as directed.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:17 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:17
reginald henry: 
re: oily skin, there is really no reason to use a moisturizer if your skin is already oily. you use a moisturizer to MAKE your skin "oily"
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:17 reginald henry
12:17
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
For oily skin a lighter lotion may be all you need to moisturize.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:17 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:18
Prue: 
Readers: We are talking with a dermatologist and the director of a skin disorders institute. Ask your skin questions now.
For all your health information, go to HealthKey at www.dailypress.com/health every day.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:18 Prue
12:18
[Comment From salsal: ] 
Hello. I was diagnosed with Pityriasis lichenoides chronica through a skin biopsy. this march will be a year that i had it. Right now it's controlled since i take light theraphy. I read that this last a couple years and can go away about the first year or two. But certain people can have it for longer. Can you advice on this thank you for your time.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:18 sal
12:19
reginald henry: 
Agree 100% with LaDonna - be compliat with med use. the most common reason pts do not improve on acne therapy is they don't use their meds - "too much trouble, too time consuming"......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:19 reginald henry
12:20
reginald henry: 
re : acne treatment may be "trouble" but acne is not pleasant either.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:20 reginald henry
12:20
[Comment From DeeDee: ] 
I have developed very oily skin and acne as an adult. I'm 48, I've been to my primary care doctor, and have tried several different antibiotics (which I'm now allergic to). She started me on aldactone in December to try and help keep my skin clear. So far it's not working very well. Do you think I should see a dermatologist about my skin problems.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:20 Dee
12:20
reginald henry: 
I had previously received this question about pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC). I wrote this response yesterday again to speed things up.
Since you who have the rash seem pretty interested (or exasperated) by the disease, you probably have already done some internet research and have found out that we know neither the cause nor the cure for the disease.
People who have PLC get patches of dry scaling skin scattered over their trunk and arms. It can look sort of like psoriasis or eczema.
We think the rash is an abnormality of the skin┐┐┐s immune system ┐┐┐ the rash develops from collections of immune cells in the skin. There is nothing wrong with the internal body┐┐┐s immune system, just the skin┐┐┐s immune system.
In any event, because we do not know the trigger for this, we do not know had to cure it. Many skin diseases sort themselves out, in this case the skin┐┐┐s immune system sometimes corrects itself, and the condition MAY resolve spontaneously. Ultraviolet light and topical steroids suppress the skin┐┐┐s immune system, treating the symptoms.

Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:20 reginald henry
12:21
Prue: 
Any answer for Dee?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:21 Prue
12:22
[Comment From SueSue: ] 
I have had a lot of problems with "knots" under the skin on my face, and with white heads around my nose. My skin is very sensitive, and has broken out from using creams more than a couple of days, even those recommended by a dermatologist.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:22 Sue
12:22
reginald henry: 
true adult acne is difficult to treat. it just doesn't get better like acne in kids. Aldactone is a very clever idea - it is a hormone blocker, often used in women with hormone induced acne . ALONG with BCP's.....
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:22 reginald henry
12:22
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Yes, I think it might be a good idea to folloup with a dermatologist.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:22 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:23
reginald henry: 
generally, if you have a skin problem that a gp can address, se a dermatologist - this is what we do evrery day
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:23 reginald henry
12:24
Prue: 
I have just received this email from a reader: Can you ask about winter rashes? All the sudden the doctor tells me I┐┐┐m allergic to soap and lotion and I have to use Dove. Something about dry skin and such and winter.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:24 Prue
12:25
reginald henry: 
regarding sue's comment regarding her sensitive skin, you probably should go back to see your dermatogist - that would be a hard question to answer on the internet without seeing you and talking for a while
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:25 reginald henry
12:25
Prue: 
Readers: We are being inundated with questions. We will get to everyone as quickly as we can. If you can't stay for the chat, be sure to check back later at dailypress.com/health and click on Archived Live Web Chats to find the full transcript. Thanks for your interest. We are here until 1 p.m.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:25 Prue
12:25
reginald henry: 
ok, another pre written winter itch note......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:25 reginald henry
12:26
reginald henry: 
I have pretyped this short exposee regarding dry skin, so on line time would not be spent with watching me type . Books have been written on this subject, what follows is a brief practical rundown of dry skin care. Below are listed 5 talking points.
Understanding Dry Skin
Normal, healthy skin is coated in a thin layer of natural lipids, or fatty substances. They keep in moisture, leaving the skin soft and supple.
Usually, something in the environment -- or something you're doing to your skin -- is stripping away these fatty oils, leaving your skin unprotected.
Just as most causes of dry skin are external, most help for dry skin is external. With careful dry skin care, you can usually help the problem. Obviously dry skin cannot be "cured".



1) Using moisturizers correctly:
If you have dry skin, you've probably already tried a moisturizer. But while moisturizers are a crucial part of dry skin care, we don't always use them correctly.
The biggest mistake we make is to apply moisturizer to dry skin, when it's least likely to help. You have to put on moisturizer when your skin is still damp. That way, the moisturizer is trapping the moisture still on your skin. Your skin shouldn't be sopping wet -- just pat yourself dry with a towel and put it on. Let it soak in for a few minutes, and then towel off the excess.
You've also got to get the right type of moisturizer. People with dry skin need to use moisturizers that have no perfumes or alcohols. The moisturizer must also be thick and greasy in order to seal in the moisture needed for good dry skin care. Creams (thicker) work better than lotions (thinner).
2) Dry Air
Dry air is probably the most common cause of dry skin, especially during the winter, it draws the moisture right out of the skin. Dry skin during winter even gets its own name: winter itch.
While cold, harsh weather does dry your skin, another big problem in the winter lies indoors -- the dry heat churned out by your furnace. (During the summer, air conditioning can have a similar effect.) To counteract the dry heat, start with a moisturizer. Turning down the thermostat a bit in the winter can also help,
3) Long, Hot Showers & Baths
Prolonged exposure to water -- especially hot water -- can wash away the natural oils that protect your skin. If you get out of the bath or shower and your skin feels tight, it's dried out.
Try to limit showers to a few minutes, skip the hot water, and unless you are really dirty, there is no need to shower every day. You might want to apply a BATH oil to your skin while it is still wet. Afterward, pat your body dry with a towel -- rather than vigorously rubbing it -- and put on a moisturizer right away. This is called the SOAK and GREASE method. It traps water in the skin. This idea is also applied to dry hands. Minimize the handwashing, and moisturize afterwards, to prevent the dry cracking.

4) Soap
One of the biggest problems people have with dry skin stems from their soap. Soap removes your skin's protective oils (that's what it is for, to remove oil and dirt), and we tend to use way too much of it.
The average person who goes to school or work just doesn't get very dirty during the day but in the shower many people scrub at their skin like it's the bottom of their shoes. Unless you're a child or a ditch digger, the only parts of the body that need any soap at all are the face, hands, feet, groin and underarms. The rest of the body can usually just be rinsed off with water.
While our mothers always told us to wash our hands frequently, that can also lead to trouble. Ironically, while done in the quest to rid ourselves of germs, excessive hand washing can dry out the skin and cause it to crack and bleed, making infection much more likely.
Many of us choose unwisely when we're in the soap aisle of the supermarket. We go for harsh soaps, such as deodorant or antibacterial soaps, that generate lots of lather and leave us feeling squeaky clean. The bubbling and lathering from soap removes the oils from the surface of the skin and dries it out.
5) AGING
┐┐┐ As we age , our skin dries out because it wears out from chronic environmental insults (sunshine, chemicals, etc), and our oil glands do not produce as much oil because of a drop in hormone levels. As many as 75% of people over 64 have dry skin. Other people, regardless of age, are simply genetically prone to dry skin.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:26 reginald henry
12:26
Prue: 
Any answer for the Dove soap question. What does it contain that 's good for winter skin?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:26 Prue
12:27
[Comment From DeeDee: ] 
What are BCP's?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:27 Dee
12:27
[Comment From SueSue: ] 
My husband and I are in our late sixties, and are developing small "bumps" on our faces that are not skin tags, and seem to be related to oil glands. Any suggestions on how to slow down the pace?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:27 Sue
12:27
reginald henry: 
Dove contains less surfactants, less ingredients to remove oil from your skin
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:27 reginald henry
12:27
Prue: 
Interesting. Thanks!
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:27 Prue
12:27
reginald henry: 
sorry dee, BCP's are birth control pills
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:27 reginald henry
12:27
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Winter and heat in our homes can be tuff on sensitive skin. There are some soap free cleanser on the market, and moisturizers that are free of certain allergens, a dermatologist could help direct you
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:27 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:28
[Comment From FrancesFrances: ] 
Can/will a dermatologist remove small, under the skin cysts which are residuals from a time the acne was more active? Also, my granddaughter has been on Accutane. Is it safe?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:28 Frances
12:29
reginald henry: 
Sue with "bumps on the face" - again would have to see the bumps to give you a dx. tehy are PROBLY areas of oil gland overgrowth - sebaceous hyperplasia - unfortunately a part of the aging process - nothing to slow that down :(
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:29 reginald henry
12:29
[Comment From KristineKristine: ] 
I have really bad eczema. It doesn't act up at all in humid weather (I am in Manila, Philippines for vacation right now). What can I do to help contain my eczema when I am in Southern California? I know the water is hard and the air is disgusting, but what can I do at home to alleviate the burning and itching?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:29 Kristine
12:30
[Comment From RuthRuth: ] 
I am an African American woman with a very fair-skinned daughter who burns easily in the sun. She has extremely sensitive skin. What sunscreen do you recommend for people with sensitive skin?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:30 Ruth
12:30
[Comment From DeeDee: ] 
Thanks!
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:30 Dee
12:30
reginald henry: 
lots of very complicated questions - hard to answer by internet typing.......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:30 reginald henry
12:30
Prue: 
LaDonna -- Can you answer the sunscreen question?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:30 Prue
12:31
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
There is much controversy in regard to ACCUTANE, there are new rules and regulations for its use. It has been on the market for decades and has helped many, a good question about its safty and one that should be dicussed with you doctor.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:31 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:31
Prue: 
Readers: We are talking to Dr. Reginald B. Henry 111, with Sentara Dermatology and LaDonna Finch, director of the Skin Disorders Institute. They have the answers to your skin questions.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:31 Prue
12:32
reginald henry: 
frances, yes, we can remove small milia (cysts) on the face.

accutane is safe , all meds have very rare side effects - got to be sure any disease is bad enough to "risk" treatment. talk with you r doc
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:32 reginald henry
12:32
Prue: 
What was the controversy with Accutane about? What were the perceived dangers?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:32 Prue
12:32
reginald henry: 
sunscreens- great question - try a chemical free sunscreen.....
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:32 reginald henry
12:33
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Bolck the sun not the fun...if you have problems with sun screen there are other ways to avoid the sun with clothing and beware aware of the hours, the worse time is 10-2
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:33 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:33
[Comment From KristineKristine: ] 
What is your opinion about glycolic peels? Would having it done at 30% each week be bad for my oily skin? I dont want to overtreat my skin...
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:33 Kristine
12:34
reginald henry: 
neutragena purpose aveeno all make chemical free sunscreen - no chemicals - just zinc oxide/ titanium dioxide - tiny particles that are inert - block sun by reflecting it back -won't irritate the skin
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:34 reginald henry
12:34
Prue: 
Thanks for those specifics on sunscreen, Dr. Henry
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:34 Prue
12:35
reginald henry: 
regarding chemical peels, I don't do them - more of a plastic surgery question - sorry
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:35 reginald henry
12:35
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
There is also a vanicream sunscreen that is chemical free and is used by many
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:35 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:35
[Comment From MikeMike: ] 
Erbitux is a chemo drug used, I am told, to treat head and neck cancer. But one of its side effects is Acne. What can be done to lessen the deleterious side effects of this chemotherapy?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:35 Mike
12:36
[Comment From SueSue: ] 
As I mentioned, a dermatologist recommended a lotion that broke me out after several days of use. I am 67 years old. I go to my dermatologist every six months for basal cell checks.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:36 Sue
12:37
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Dr Henry may be able to address this in regard to chemo. There are benifits with risk
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:37 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:38
[Comment From salsal: ] 
for PLC do you know why some internet sites say the rash normally goes away in a year or two and yet again cerain people have it for longer than that. I would assume everone reacts different.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:38 sal
12:40
Prue: 
Readers: We have just a few more minutes for you to ask your questions. Dr. Henry has momentarily lost Internet connection but hopes to be back with us soon.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:40 Prue
12:41
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Yes, everyone reacts differently, the internet supplies general info and guidelines.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:41 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:42
Prue: 
Again, if you want to see the whole transcript after the chat -- and there's tons of information here, go to www.dailypress.com/health and click the tab Archived Live Web chats.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:42 Prue
12:42
reginald henry: 
online
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:42 reginald henry
12:42
reginald henry: 
i'm back
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:42 reginald henry
12:43
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Thanks for taking my question. I have a simple question for you....as a person of color, what's the best way to rid of acne scars?For me, it seems like cocoa butter or shea butter isn't the way to go, because for me it don't work.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:43 Guest
12:43
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
The issues with accutane are detailed, Guidelines have to be followed by the patient and the doctor. Birth control during use of accutane is an issue if you are child bearing age.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:43 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:43
Prue: 
Thanks for that info on accutane, LaDonna
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:43 Prue
12:43
reginald henry: 
re plc, diseases don't read books. books necessarily have to talk in generalizations. all diseases run on bell curves, ther's always an outlyer
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:43 reginald henry
12:44
Prue: 
Any advice on acne scars? That would seem to be a very common concern.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:44 Prue
12:44
reginald henry: 
re: acne scars, you talking about true thick scars or dark spots?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:44 reginald henry
12:45
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
We are lucky in the Tidewater are to have a SKIN OF COLOR RESEARCH INSTITUTE, it is a part of Hampton University, they may be helpful.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:45 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:45
Prue: 
Dr. Henry -- could you give advice for both types of acne scarring?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:45 Prue
12:46
Prue: 
I have some other questions that were e-mailed from readers: A couple about rosacea. Could you tell readers what rosacea is and what the recommended treatment is?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:46 Prue
12:46
reginald henry: 
true scars - thick skin or depressed skin- may fade with time -steroid injex may help if they ar very thick. MEDERMA MAY help the thick scars. DARK SPOTS ( NOT SCARS) cwil fade with time bleachinfg creams help......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:46 reginald henry
12:47
reginald henry: 
more pretying:

Rosacea (also known as adult acne) is a very common condition. It looks similar to adult acne except it is generally seen in older individuals, and in addition to acne pus bumps, patients also can develop broken blood vessels.
Maybe 15% of patients with rosacea on the facial skin also can get rosacea in the eye (ocular rosacea) . those patients get red eye (conjunctivitis) and can also get styes from plugged up oil glands around the eyes which can get infected.
Treatment is with topical antibiotics, antibiotic soaps and cleansers, an doral antibiotics. All of these need a doctor┐┐┐s prescription.


Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:47 reginald henry
12:47
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin disease characterized by flushing,redness usually on the face
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:47 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:48
reginald henry: 
yes good point, pts with rosacea FLUSH which worsens th eredness over time
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:48 reginald henry
12:49
reginald henry: 
anything you can do to minimize th e facial flush will help decrease the longterm permanent redness......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:49 reginald henry
12:49
reginald henry: 
plastic surgeons have lasers that can help the red broken blood vessls - doesn't really treat the underlying problem though
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:49 reginald henry
12:50
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
There is no cure for Rosacea, there are positive treatment and symptoms can be reduced
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:50 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:50
Prue: 
Is diet considered to be a factor in any of these skin diseases?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:50 Prue
12:50
reginald henry: 
LaDonna, tell me about the Skin of Color Institute
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:50 reginald henry
12:51
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Diet can play a factor, in many diseases,
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:51 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:51
Prue: 
Any particular foods to avoid with inflammatory skin diseases?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:51 Prue
12:51
reginald henry: 
diet and rosacea -caffeine, hot foods, spicy foots, alcohol, all can IN SOME PEOPLE , causing flushing which then worsens the permanent longterm redness
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:51 reginald henry
12:52
Prue: 
Experts: Please let our readers know how they can reach you for any follow-up questions/information.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:52 Prue
12:53
reginald henry: 
other inflammatory diseases - suggestion: EAT RIGHT. avoid fatty foods - makes psoriasis worse. avoid too much alcohol - makes eczema and psorisis worse. TAKE CARE of your body - you've only got one for one go around
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:53 reginald henry
12:53
Prue: 
I had a long e-mail from a gentleman over 80 who wonders if his seasonal skin rash (more than 10 years) on his legs could have to do with contact with Agent Orange? your thoughts?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:53 Prue
12:53
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
The Hampton University Skin Of Color Research INstitute is a wonderful resource.
It started in Sept of 2010. Dr Valerie Harvey from EVMS is very involved. I will be glad to send you more info from my office.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:53 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:54
reginald henry: 
Death Becomes Her - great bruce willis goldy hawn marel streep movie about taking care of yourself
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:54 reginald henry
12:54
Prue: 
LaDonna -- that's great information. I wasn't aware of it. Could you also tell readers where they can find you at the Skin Disorders Institute and what kind of help you provide.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:54 Prue
12:54
Prue: 
Dr. Henry -- I think that's the first movie recommendation we've had during a health chat!
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:54 Prue
12:54
[Comment From ChuckChuck: ] 
I'm a 46 year old Black male and have had occasional acne problem all my adult life. I had a major outbreak about 15 years ago and went on Accutane treatment and it cleared my skin up completely for about 5 or 6 years. Now, as I wirte this, I have several small cyst like bumps on my cheeks. I found a product called Nature's Cure 2 Part Acne Treatment for Males. It comes in pill form and you take one in the morning and one in the evening for 30 days. It actually seems to work well at reducing my occasional break-outs. Any thoughts on the long-term effectiveness of the product?
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:54 Chuck
12:55
reginald henry: 
i'm at sentara dermatolgy specialists on kempsville road.

Dr HArvy at EVMS is a wonderful woman. great help to our derm community - glad she's helping out over there
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:55 reginald henry
12:56
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Yes, you can call the ISDI 757-223-0795. I am honored to sit on the board of the HUSCRI and can provide more info, per request. Or you can contact them directly.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:56 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:56
Prue: 
Any answer for Chuck?I notice we're getting a lot of adult acne questions.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:56 Prue
12:57
reginald henry: 
re: Nature's cure for acne =- don't know of that specific product - but if it works , go for it. There are lots of htings that help specific disease, glad you found something that works
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:57 reginald henry
12:58
reginald henry: 
skin disease is so odd - so many things work in some people but not in others..
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:58 reginald henry
12:58
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
I am not familiar with that either, however, like Dr H says if it works and there are no contrindications
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:58 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:58
Prue: 
Dr. Reginald Henry and LaDonna Finch -- Thank you so much for your expertise in answering the many questions we had today. Readers can access the chat at www.dailypress.com/health under the Tab, Archived Live Web Chats.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:58 Prue
12:58
reginald henry: 
I have some pts who swear by one product, other pts cannot believe I gave them that same product for the same disease. "a total waste of money" we try ......
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:58 reginald henry
12:59
reginald henry: 
thanks to everyone for attending
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:59 reginald henry
12:59
LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute: 
Thank you for having me on this web chat
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:59 LaDonna Finch, Inflammatory Skin Disease Institute
12:59
Prue: 
Look for our Live Health Chats every Wednesday at noon and the last Friday of the month at 11 a.m.
Our next chat is on Jan. 26 at noon on the subject of seasonal affective disorder and depression.
Thanks for joining us.
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:59 Prue
1:00
Prue: 
The chat is now closing. Bye!
Wednesday January 19, 2011 1:00 Prue
1:00